Connect with others who understand.

sign up log in
Resources
About MyFibroTeam
Powered By
In Partnership With American Medical ID ?

What To Engrave on a Fibromyalgia Medical ID: 5 Essentials and Other Ideas

Posted on November 30, 2022
Medically reviewed by
Neil J. Gonter, M.D.
Article written by
Anastasia Climan, RDN, CDN

A medical ID is a form of identification that notifies others about your health in an emergency. People with fibromyalgia (also known as fibro) may consider medical ID jewelry to alert first responders to their symptoms and medications.

“I have an ID bracelet because I take several medications and have allergies to others,” shared one member of MyFibroTeam. “One time, I fell at home, breaking my leg, dislocating my knee, and hitting my head on a wrought iron table (concussion). I had one of these bracelets on. The paramedic later told me the info from the bracelet can be a lifesaver.”

Some medical jewelry allows you to design custom engraving of your information, and others provide slots for paper inserts. In the United States, medical IDs usually have the Star of Life medical symbol, representing emergency medical services. This symbol signifies the wearer has a medical condition that emergency services should note.

Putting the right information on your medical ID is critical, but it doesn’t have to be complicated. Here are some ideas about what to engrave on yours.

1. Identifying Information

Your medical ID should clearly display your full name. Sometimes, people with seizures or trouble communicating also list their full home address in case they become confused and unable to get home. But otherwise, leave your address and other private information (like your social security number) off your medical ID.

2. Emergency Contact Person

List the phone number of someone to call if you’re unable to speak for yourself. This could be a friend, family member, or your health care provider. Be sure the person is familiar with your medical issues and knows that you’re listing them as an emergency contact. You can abbreviate the words “in case of emergency” with the acronym ICE to save space on your medical ID bracelet.

3. Relevant Symptoms and Medical History

People with fibromyalgia experience fatigue, migraines, severe pain, insomnia, and cognitive changes. Making the connection clear between your symptoms and fibromyalgia can help others understand what’s happening during a medical emergency.

Along with listing relevant fibromyalgia symptoms, make sure to note any other chronic (ongoing) conditions. For example, if you have heart disease or diabetes, you’ll want others to be aware during an emergency. This is particularly crucial if you take medications like insulin or if you have an implanted device such as a pacemaker.

4. Medications

If you take any medications with significant side effects or potential interactions, you may want to note a few details in addition to just listing your meds. To save space, this can be as simple as the words, “Taking Lyrica, see med card in wallet.” A separate medical ID card provides more room for details.

Here are some common medications used for fibro and examples of why they might be important to list on a medical ID.

  • Antidepressants — These medications can cause drowsiness, which may affect your ability to drive safely. Letting police or other officials know you’re on antidepressants can help ensure that appropriate actions are taken to get you home safely and avoid mistaking your symptoms for alcohol intoxication.
  • Anticonvulsants — If you’re prescribed pregabalin (Lyrica) or gabapentin (Neurontin) to treat fibromyalgia symptoms, you may also become drowsy or depressed. It’s helpful for first responders to know about these side effects if you’re in an emergency situation.
  • Pain medications — People with fibromyalgia may be prescribed opioids or medical marijuana to help manage chronic pain. By noting your prescription on a medical ID, you’ll help prevent confusion about your possession of these substances and make it easier for a first responder to identify an accidental overdose or interaction.

Additionally, if you take muscle relaxants, sleep medication, or stimulants for fibromyalgia, be sure to note them on your medical ID for the same reasons listed above.

5. Allergies and Other Considerations

If you have life-threatening allergies, consider a medical ID to help protect yourself from accidental exposure during an emergency. If you don’t have allergies, you can include the letters NKA to indicate “no known allergies.”

In addition, people with advance directives, such as do not resuscitate (DNR), may want to specify these choices on their medical ID.

Types of Medical IDs for Fibromyalgia

A wearable medical ID is one of the easiest and most effective ways to communicate your health information in an emergency. Aside from bracelets, there are additional options for medical IDs, including watches, ID necklaces, wallet cards, medical ID tags, pendants, and key fobs. Some people even opt for medical ID tattoos — tattoos that provide the same identifying information as traditional medical IDs.

Fortunately, electronic medical IDs don’t require service, upkeep, or have batteries that run out.

Audio Recorders

Audio medical IDs are small audio recorders that clip onto your clothing. They allow you to save information in an audio file that responders can listen to. You can record a message that includes details about first aid or any relevant medical information. If you are unable to speak or respond, paramedics can easily press play to listen to your prerecorded information.

USB Devices

Another alternative is a USB device that holds your medical information, which you can attach to a dog tag or wristband. If you opt for a USB medical ID, keep in mind that personal medical information is sensitive and confidential and should only be stored and accessed securely. When looking to buy a USB medical ID, make sure it has an encryption feature with proper security guarantees from the manufacturer.

Smartphone Apps for Medical IDs

Some smartphones can let people access specific types of medical information from their lock screen. This feature allows medical professionals to see your health information without needing a password for your phone.

If you have an iPhone, you can set up a smart medical ID by following these instructions.

If you have an Android or other non-iOS phone, you may need to download a third-party mobile app. Simply search for “medical ID app” in the Google Play Store or your phone manufacturer’s app store.

Near-field communication (NFC) allows smartphones and other similar devices to communicate with other technologies and transfer information — including medical information — by touch. If you have a wristband, wallet card, or key fob that uses NFC, medical personnel can access your medical information on a secure website in case of an emergency. This information can include anything you think would be important in a medical emergency, including care plans, prescriptions, and medical documents.

Talk With Others Who Understand

MyFibroTeam is the social network for people with fibromyalgia and their loved ones. On MyFibroTeam, more than 284,000 members come together to ask questions, give advice, and share their stories with others who understand life with fibromyalgia.

Do you have a medical alert ID bracelet or another type of medical ID for fibromyalgia? If so, what does it look like, and what type of information is on it? Share your experiences in a comment below or on your Activities page.

American Medical ID is proud to celebrate over 25 years of serving the chronic health community by offering personalized, custom-engraved medical ID jewelry. In an emergency, the jewelry allows medics or other medical professionals to give prompt, precise treatment. Leading physicians, pharmacists, educators, and hospitals endorse American Medical ID jewelry for people living with a chronic condition.

All updates must be accompanied by text or a picture.
Neil J. Gonter, M.D. is the Assistant Professor of Medicine at Columbia University. Learn more about him here.
Anastasia Climan, RDN, CDN is a dietitian with over 10 years of experience in public health and medical writing. Learn more about her here.

Related articles

No one knows how fibromyalgia develops, but many researchers believe it involves an interaction ...

Symptoms of Fibromyalgia

No one knows how fibromyalgia develops, but many researchers believe it involves an interaction ...
When you have fibromyalgia, it can be challenging to get a good night’s sleep. Insomnia, sleep di...

Fibromyalgia and Insomnia

When you have fibromyalgia, it can be challenging to get a good night’s sleep. Insomnia, sleep di...
If you’re experiencing frequent itching with fibromyalgia, you’re not alone. MyFibroTeam members...

Itching with Fibromyalgia

If you’re experiencing frequent itching with fibromyalgia, you’re not alone. MyFibroTeam members...
Members of MyFibroTeam search for ways to increase their energy as they battle fatigue, one of ...

Increasing Energy with Fibromyalgia

Members of MyFibroTeam search for ways to increase their energy as they battle fatigue, one of ...
The study found that the main reason (33 percent) why CFS patients went to the emergency departme...

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients Get Short Shrift in ERs

The study found that the main reason (33 percent) why CFS patients went to the emergency departme...
Fibromyalgia can make routine dental work more uncomfortable. Even simple dental procedures may r...

Dental Health and Fibro

Fibromyalgia can make routine dental work more uncomfortable. Even simple dental procedures may r...

Recent articles

If you’re living with fibromyalgia, you’re already aware of the impact the condition can have on ...

Fibromyalgia Awareness: How To Get Involved

If you’re living with fibromyalgia, you’re already aware of the impact the condition can have on ...
It takes a village to support living with a chronic condition like fibromyalgia. Whether other My...

Find Your People on MyFibroTeam

It takes a village to support living with a chronic condition like fibromyalgia. Whether other My...
You can never ask too many questions on MyFibroTeam. Other members are here to support you, help ...

Share and Receive on MyFibroTeam

You can never ask too many questions on MyFibroTeam. Other members are here to support you, help ...
A great first step on MyFibroTeam is to share your story with other members. Introducing yourself...

Tell Your Story on MyFibroTeam

A great first step on MyFibroTeam is to share your story with other members. Introducing yourself...
To determine how you can reduce your medical expenses, MyFibroTeam sat down with Susan Null of S...

How To Reduce Medical Bills: Top Financial Expert Shares 10 Tips

To determine how you can reduce your medical expenses, MyFibroTeam sat down with Susan Null of S...
Because the physical impact of fibromyalgia can be all-consuming, you may be dealing with psychol...

How Fibromyalgia Can Affect Your Mental Health

Because the physical impact of fibromyalgia can be all-consuming, you may be dealing with psychol...
MyFibroTeam My fibromyalgia Team

Thank you for subscribing!

Become a member to get even more:

sign up for free

close
MyFibroTeam
Add to your home screen
MyFibroTeam Tap below and then 'Add to Home Screen'